Unfazed Under Fire Podcast

The Resilient Leader Method - a process that instantly unlocks resilient leadership in times that are demanding it - with Anatoly Yakorev

January 09, 2024 David Craig Utts, The Resilient Leadership Guy Season 2 Episode 1
Unfazed Under Fire Podcast
The Resilient Leader Method - a process that instantly unlocks resilient leadership in times that are demanding it - with Anatoly Yakorev
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

As the flames of executive challenges rage in today's disruptive business environment, Anatoly Yakorev and I stand ready to arm you with the Resilient Leader Method—a transformative approach that promises to reignite your innate potential. Discover how to break free from the chains of past conditioning and reactivity, and how my tailored coaching in tandem with Anatoly's Resilient Leadership Reset process can help you rise above the obstacles that have long hindered leadership effectiveness. This is not just a lesson in resilience; it's a masterclass in cultivating a life of creativity, optimism, and success.

Venture with us into the hidden depths of the human being, where the real treasures lie, waiting to be unlocked. We'll guide you beyond the seductive quick fixes of binaural beats, micro-dosing, and biohacking to a place where your inner resources are the true power players. As we dissect the unique pressures business leaders face, we underscore the significance of personal development in achieving professional mastery. Prepare to be inspired as we share stories of personal transformation, demonstrating how gratitude, self-reflection, and self-leadership can sculpt the resilient, focused, and confident leader within you.

Finally, Anatoly and I traverse the inner world of the mind, where the soothing frequencies of brain waves, from delta to gamma, play their symphony. We take you on a journey of resetting and integrating new positive experiences, emphasizing the critical role of theta waves in intuition and healing. Our discussion unveils how powerful transformations can transcend age and preconceptions, and how the practice of journaling and meditation paves the way for lasting change. So, join us for an exploration into the art of resilience and leadership evolution—it's an expedition that promises to reshape not just your executive leadership impact, but your entire life.

Unfazed Under Fire Podcast - Host: David Craig Utts, The Resilient Leadership Guy

Introduction:

Welcome to Unfazed Under Fire, a podcast that supports executives to deepen their impact in resiliency in an increasingly chaotic and uncertain world. Our mission facilitates the growth of enlightened leaders who build empowering, high-performing cultures that unify great talent and turn profound visions into reality. Now, tuning into your needs, here's your host and moderator, seasoned executive coach and the resilient leadership guy, David Utts.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

So happy new year and welcome back to Unfazed Under Fire. I'm your host, david Kregutz, the resilient leadership guy. It's hard to believe Unfazed Under Fire is moving into its second year of production and I want to thank all my listeners for making that possible, and if you find these podcasts insightful, I would really appreciate it if you could share it with your network or through social media, and thank you in advance for that. Now, today, I want to kick off 2024 right by bringing Anatoly Yakorev back to revisit the resilient leader method that we discussed in our most recent podcast. Now, given how much my clients have benefited from this process, I wanted to start the new year off with a robust podcast on the subject so that other executives are aware that this is available, because I firmly believe the resilient leader method may be the most potent and quickest leadership development approach in today's uncertain, chaotic business environment that is demanding executives deepen their impact as leaders. Now, my journey with this process started back in October 2021, with me being introduced to Anatoly by a colleague, and that first conversation I could tell Anatoly was different, because as we spoke, I felt a deep calmness come over me and, following that call, I felt this kind of inner joy arise and creativity that stayed with me for the rest of the day. Because of this experience, I decided to go through the reset process that Anatoly described in that first conversation, and I still remember what it felt like. Following those sessions with you, anatoly. I felt this calmness and new energy of optimism emerge. More creativity came into my work. But, unlike my experience in a first conversation, this experience has not only lasted. It continues to deepen. Two years later, in fact, since my sessions, my coaching practice has tripled in size and my life is flowing much more easily and effortlessly, and I can see this shift directly relates to how I was holding myself back in life. As I look back, it was almost as if I was driving the car with both the foot on the gas and the brakes at the same time. But after those sessions with Anatoly, with you, those interopsicles dissolved and further. My fiancé, who is also a therapist, went through the process and has had equally amazing results and stunning breakthroughs in her life.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Now. This experience made me realize that Anatoly's reset process was the answer I've been looking for and supported my mission to expand enlightened leadership in the business world and to support my clients to ignite their most powerful expression of leadership so they could have the impact they desire, and we began to work together to create the resilient leader method, which combines Anatoly's gift with a follow on coaching that ensures executives maximize the impact of Anatoly's work. You see, for years I know what held my clients back most was their past conditioning and the resulting reactivity that came from it. Now this reactivity is a natural result of living as a human being in this world over time, but in most cases this reactivity starts early in childhood, as we face what may feel like invalidation or deep disappointments, or overcompensating because we doubt ourselves a bit. I saw this conditioning and reactivity play out in several ways with my clients. For example, it could be that they have little crises of confidence, or they may feel they need to be overbearing because they need to take control of the situation, or losing it with their teams, or not being willing to stand toe to toe with their bosses or other challenging personalities to work things through, or, on a more personal level, not being able to sleep at night or enjoy time with their families because the weight of their jobs is constantly with them and they can't let it go. Now there are many other examples of how this past conditioning can mute one's impact as a leader, but what they all have in common is that it mutes an individual's power to create and achieve their aspirations.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Now, while I've developed several effective approaches over 27 years that have proven to support my clients and become more creative and effective, including becoming a trauma informed coach, these approaches were still insufficient to lift all those things that are deeply held in my client's brains and nervous systems. So I was looking for something that could help my clients truly shine, and to do so in a way that did not require years of commitment from them, and I found it in my partnership with you, anatoly, and I appreciate that. Now, fast forward. Today, you and I are approaching, working with over 20 leaders who have been through this process with Anatoly with stunning results.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

And you again, just to remind people of your background, before all of this started unfolding, you had 25 years as a cross-cultural consultant with BPM ago, so you know what it's like to be in the executive suite. And then, over the next 25 years following your days in BP, you served as an ethics and compliance consultant, and now we're working together with the focus of helping enlightened leadership rapidly expand in a world that's yearning for it, and I really appreciate that work. So I think most people now desire to find leaders who bring us together rather than divide us, and who genuinely care to improve the quality of life on this planet rather than simply personally benefiting from their jobs. And with Anatoly, I know we can make huge strides in creating that kind of leadership in a world that needs and deserves it. So, with all that said, happy new year, anatoly, and thank you for joining me back on the show today. I really appreciate having you.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Oh, thank you, David, great to be back. Yeah, it's great to be with you.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

So let's start by maybe revisiting the growing dilemma that executives face today, but I think it kind of boils down to three things that are confronting them. Well, first of all, they're having to run organizations in a face of a massive global disruption that is influencing their business and they have to learn how to deal with. Second, they still have to do their jobs, create value, grow the business and have value in their executive roles. But third, because of the first two that are combining and creating pressure, there's a demand to clearly develop a deeper quality of leadership so they can have the impact they desire in this chaotic world, so they can dance in the chaos and maybe even leverage the chaos to take advantage and create opportunities.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

But all three of those things take tremendous time, right? So the challenge is how do I keep those balls in the air, if you will, and I find that the one ball that tends to drop most is the development and self-reflective ball, Because that one I'm being looked at directly with the first two. The third can be somewhat apparent at times, but it's not something I have time to deal with. But I would like to hear what you would say about whether that has a good summary what's happening or what you would add to that.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Yes, david, that's absolutely a very good summary of all the range of challenges that executives are facing today, and except maybe we can pay more attention to the fact that, on the emotional front, that's where challenges begin to emerge, maybe because of all the societal pressures for executives to become a bit of role models, not only for their teams but for the society as well.

Anatoly Yakorev:

And therefore, when you put them under such a microscope and the lens of how the society views their business leadership skills, not too many people feel comfortable being able to demonstrate the qualities that are required. And another point that you made, you're absolutely right, because why are we talking about the era of self-development becoming such an important asset these days? Well, technically speaking, it's just because to invest time in developing those much needed skills. I don't think many people can do that because they can barely operate and juggle work and life. How can they find the time to do that If people who are in leading positions they can't even find to go to the gym to keep themselves in a good physical shape? So that raises the issue how can we in the 21st century compensate those stellar individuals to become better, and especially when they've got all these wonderful things deep inside of them. How can we help them bring them forward so that their teams can also benefit from that?

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Yeah, and I think another thing I want to say is that the power of the mind and of the thought process is amazing. I mean, we've got this supercomputer between our ears, but it feels like there's other resources that are available to us as well, that when we listen to that noise and sometimes a lot of times it's helpful a lot of times it's just noise, right, which is you know, it's arguing with us, it's trying to figure things out, it's reacting because it's so deeply connected to the survival mechanism, right? So if we go into a reactive state, the brain is not our friend necessarily, right? Because we're not really facing a saber to the tide, we're just facing somebody that pissed us off, right, but now we're reacting and our brain's doing its thing and having this whole commentary on it. So it feels as if we've kind of worshiped this as a deity.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

The thinking mind what would you say about other resources that could, because you mentioned it at the end of the last when you were talking? There's other things that we can tap into that can create a serenity and help us solve problems in a different way. Along with the thinking mind, what would you say to? What are those other resources that are available to us?

Anatoly Yakorev:

Well, let's put it this way. So, because of the, you know, advancing technology, there are lots of things that people try to identify as those crutches for themselves, right From binary beats, you know, from special meditative music, you know, we're going way now beyond, like you know, yoga, meditative practices, because people are looking for something that could deliver them the kick much needed to help them stay competitive, help them stay in a very balanced form. So basically, yeah, there are lots of crazy things as well, we're hearing.

Anatoly Yakorev:

You know from micro dosing, from. You know blood transfusion, from bio. You know hacking techniques. You know all that stuff you know.

Anatoly Yakorev:

So there's so much that people want to focus that is sitting outside of their reach, right, and we always tend to forget that most of the stuff we need is inside of us, is just stays underdeveloped or it stays neglected because it's being blocked by, you know, years or decades of conditioning.

Anatoly Yakorev:

You know, like child trauma and things that we never really paid attention to. It's like, you know, it's like when you don't go to the gym, you don't practice, you don't even go for a walk. Over time it begins to take us tall and your performance goes down and you can't really compensate it with anything other than just, you know, recommencing that practice of going to the gym. So now but this is the hardest thing because people don't want to believe that they have all the answers inside of them. We just don't believe it. Right, because we did talk about you know podcasts, about you know a silver bullet solution or anything that's out. There has got to be that quick fix that people feel entitled. You know like we need to get it because you know we are very well developed individuals.

Anatoly Yakorev:

we did well in this material world. So to help us get you know, shape and, and that's going to give us that much needed fix, okay, so that's where people will continuously overlook that what they have inside of them is actually by far of the formal value to them that they could possibly imagine. So so you, david, that's your role to actually bring them in alignment with themselves and identify that all they need to find is there. And my role is basically just to give a bit of a nudge so that people feel okay. Well, it's actually feels nice to be reconnecting to myself. It's like I owe my own development to myself, which is like a bit of a preposterous thought and, as we may imagine, but that's exactly it. So I know lots of books have been written on this topic. Like you know, tap, you know, into your own potential.

Anatoly Yakorev:

A lot of white noise, a lot of informational voices out there, but at the same time, what bridges that noise from that realization is that people need to see even smaller results, but sooner rather than later. You can't keep telling them like, oh, it's around the corner, just another decade of meditation, or another decade of meditation. You can't be doing that because we no longer think in long term. Today, you know we all we are thinking like okay, I just need to clock my cells this week, right, or I need to do something today I can't be thinking about, you know, my future. So I think that's where we're getting closer to getting that to work for people, showing them results quicker rather than later.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Yeah, and we'll talk about some of the success stories later in the podcast we've experienced. But what I've noticed is, you know, the people that I'm working with, I had the great fortune to work with and that you have worked with, are really stellar human beings and really top flight leaders already, and that seems we'll talk about the qualities of the ideal person for this process when we go forward. We're kind of doing a foreshadowing here. But there's just those nagging things like for each of the people that I'd worked with before the reset that when those get cleared there's just another set of capacities that are opened up that, as you say, you know can be developed in various other means. But there is a price of time in those.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

And we have executives that don't have the luxury of that because they have so much on their shoulders every day they don't have the time to do all the things that we know that would be helpful for them, or they're not drawn to it because their job is so consuming for them in a positive way that they want to attend to that. And this brings me to the other question why focus? You know we came together not just because of your abilities but because of a common mission to grow and advance more enlightened business leadership in the world and I guess again I want to reinforce. Why is that your mission? Why is it that you felt a desire to join with me and others that are executive coaches that are aiming to do that? Because this gift could be applied in many other ways to many other people. There's many other people in the world that could utilize and gain benefits from this. So just thoughts, your thoughts on that.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Well, that's a good question, because I think that you know, our life experience is extremely important in terms of how we gain understanding of this world and what we are doing.

Anatoly Yakorev:

You know, if you get, if you become, you know, not really attached to what you have been doing in life, and then you try to work with others people would not like that you have to bring your life experience to the fore and then realize that the people you're working with you understand the nature of those issues they're dealing with. So my understanding is that that business leaders today are extremely important. They're the, you know, the healthy fabric of our society. They put bread on the table. They're the ones you know who are out there and you know what's really important. They actually working with their teams on to them.

Anatoly Yakorev:

So which means that you know these people make our civilization so important that certain things would take for granted. But it comes from their commitment, from their grit. So working with them makes it easier for us to relate to the nature of those challenges they have. And no wonder, since I've spent 25 years with BP and Emiko, you know I learned a lot from those folks and, as a result, I would like to give back because that terrain is familiar to me.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Got it Absolutely Well. When we're working with a leader, what do you, what are we, what are we tapping into, or what do we need to tap into to help them grow and catalyze that new, more robust impact coming forward from them? What is it that we, what is it that you are tapping into when you're doing the reset process and igniting that that makes such a big difference for people who go through the process?

Anatoly Yakorev:

Well, I mean, like I said, that's actually going back to going back to the previous question. You know, how we relate to them is important and that's why, in my approach, that way of relating to them happens at the level of the Olympic system that I can make resonate with me. You know, we, you, you, raise many issues in about the timing and everything, but let's not forget that trust is an important element. If people don't really trust you, or they don't trust that you can deliver, you can't really have an image of there, right? So, therefore, we are dealing with juggling things like timing, trust and potential reactivity, when our ego structures rebelled, because, because of that initial taste of transformative change is not that sometimes pleasant right?

Anatoly Yakorev:

Because to to, to, you know, protect our personal identity, certain changes our ego systems, they want to, like, really nip it in the bud, not to bring in this much desired change but rather preserve the status quo. So this is something that we are dealing with. So, if we're going to use the way to connect with the limbic system by creating that limbic resonance that compensates for the lack of trust, because through the biological and bodily sensations, you know, a person feels attuned with what I say, you know, during the session and that's very important because, you know, since swift trust can be established on a neural level, that helps create that sort of experience that the person can deepen without further resistance and we don't have time to, you know, compensate for the resistance and all of that. So, if that resistance naturally goes away, that allows the individual to actually embark on a path of self healing Because I'm not a healer, I'm not saying I will heal them. They can effectively do it themselves. They just need to be in some sort of a resonance to allow that to happen.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Right, great, we'll talk about that in a second as well as well, about that piece that you just mentioned. But I'm going to step back to the current methodology of leadership development and you're speaking to one of the potential limitations of those development features, which is it doesn't get deeply into the nervous system to create that release. Right, but are there other things that you're seeing now that, post COVID, the old approaches or leadership development approaches are not as effective, and not only because they're not because they have. They have a validity to them, but it's also the times we're in and what's being called for from leaders right now. It's not like those were bad and wrong approaches, right, but is there, are we? Is there something that's occurring in the environment? Now, maybe speaking a little bit to the first question, but maybe going a little deeper, that's, keeping those approaches from having impact understanding, training and maybe doing a more formal traditional executive coaching, engagement or whatever. What would you say to that?

Anatoly Yakorev:

You're making a very good point here, because a lot of coaches and people out there in the field complain that their pre-COVID practices are under a lot of strain to actually meet the current nature of this emerging challenges. But we can speak boldly about the nature of those new things, new emerging tendencies. First, it's an unprecedented level of emotional depletion that we have because of the media, because of the way anything around us that actually could be dismissed out of hand is the informational noise, but it does. All of that does take a toll on our nervous system. So our emotional depletion has gotten so much to the point that we can. We said we began to have difficulties relating to one another.

Anatoly Yakorev:

The second thing is a so-called mental fatigue because the level of information and data we are being subjected to is just phenomenal. It's too much information and therefore our reactive state is just a reaction that we get inundated with dreams of data, sometimes not much relevant, sometimes it's just that white noise that masks itself to be relevant to what we need to know. And people talk about FOMO, fear of missing out. Fear of missing out is because it's been drilled in us to think we need to cover as much ground as possible just to stay afloat, to make sense of what's happening around us, because if we stay out of touch with the informational flow we may miss out on something important.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Now, those two elements I highlighted. Of course it goes deeper, because this emotional and mental challenges. They further connect to the level of our physical fatigue with all that's happening, because we don't get enough to replenish our inner resources with something healthier, because we are distraught, we've got too much happening around us, we feel confused. And maybe the last element I would add here is the quality of interpersonal relationships that we have. It's no longer so enriching because with folks being so confused around us, we can't have the high quality face time with each other anymore. But that's an important element. This is part of any healthy psyche to have a meaningful relationship, have people around us that we can rely on. Once it's taken out, we are faced with the level of challenges we're not prepared for.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

I think the emotional load is a really good point that people are just feeling more of an emotional load.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

And sometimes it's almost like a frog in water, where the water is getting warmer and warmer and warmer. I know that metaphor is overused, but it's so true. I think most executives are actually not necessarily. They might see it's there, but they don't want to pay attention to it. They don't want to look at it because they have. They've got their jobs to do, they've got their teams to build, they've got expectations on them, but it doesn't mean that that emotional load is still not loading on to them and wearing them down little by little. It's like that water is heating up, but they're not quite. Oh, it feels warm, but it's not bad. So I think that's really well said.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

And the other thing is is people are reaching out for more coaching. They're reaching out for micro dosing, as you said earlier. They're reaching out for trying to do different things, to improve their lot, but they're grasping for straws a little bit. That's why they're grasping for straws and they're really looking for kind of the solution that the resilient leader method provides. But I want to drill a little bit down now onto the method and spend most of the rest of the time speaking about that. So if a leader wants to engage the resilient leader method, what can they expect at a high level, like what would you say? That would be a fair expectation to hold if they're a good candidate for it. First of all, we'll talk about that in a bit. And they're coming to it and they've got green lights. It's going to support them. What should they expect when they go through the process?

Anatoly Yakorev:

Yes, that's a good question, so let's focus on.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

So there's two sides of that, the process and the results. So both of those.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Okay. So let's kind of start with the results, because basically, if we're looking at what exactly would be, let's say, an average ratio that people may get outside of this experience, so if we'll look at, for example, like a spike up to I mean like 20-30% in terms of their increased focus, better creativity, increased resilience, better energy, better performance and, especially, growing confidence that they need to manage that, all of that, even if we put it at say, 20-30% spike, this is like again, that's the raw data, because it's very individual for every person and every person may have, for example, up to 50% of both of their energy. They may have so much energy that they will need only three hours of sleep. Well, some people it's different. Okay, so that's what I'm saying Like it's not programmable to have those results, so we can just keep that in a very conservative manner around those percentage points. But what I noticed, that if people just get that boost in creativity and the level of resilience that they could receive, the way they respond to stress, even if you just look at two elements out of five or six, which is, like you know, very general items that, using an example of executive, creates a lot of value for the executive and for their teams, okay, and then what's really important is that this person would say, oh, this stuff is mine, I own this outcome, I owe it to myself. Okay, so I basically brought up a higher level of being able to function at a totally different level. I just did it myself, for myself and it's my own stuff. So that's why it's closer to the heart and that's why it's a lot of people find it more appealing that it's not being imposed on them and especially not pushing their belief systems, you know, to accept and take things on faith. Okay, so that's on the results side.

Anatoly Yakorev:

On the process, that's also.

Anatoly Yakorev:

You know, we look at the advantage of the process being very straightforward.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Okay, because if you look at the format, it's actually a storytelling format that everybody talks about so much.

Anatoly Yakorev:

The difference here is that in a storytelling format, rather than just getting excited about the story and having those temporary spikes in dopamine and oxidizing whatever you know, we actually see a different mechanism getting engaged. It's just the way your body, you know, your nervous system, responds just to the sound waves of the human voice, can actually create a miracle. It just triggers the process of self-patching, of rewiring all the elements that we have, including the negative blockage and all the baggage from the years of neglect, emotional neglect or neural neglect it just starts doing that on its own. So, in other words, you don't have to consciously do anything to actually make sure you keep an eye on the process so that it doesn't stop, or you have to do something to support it. So I think those two parts are rather appealing, because anybody who says like, oh, actually it's pretty nice, I don't have to do anything other than you know, take that leap of faith first and let the process take care of itself.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Right and the process itself only takes two one hour sessions or one and a half hour depending on the client right. The reset process is a very short time investment and then we have the coaching post. But if you think about that, you're talking about a total process of six months to be fully renewed and reset to original factory settings in your nervous system without all the reactivity that's. That's pretty good deal, right. You know something else you said about how you, your gift and how people engage with the process, and I'd like you to share kind of some context around brainwave frequency and what we find ourselves in. I don't want to draw us into a deep scientific conversation, but I think it's important and what's why I had listening to you on these calls makes a difference in ignites that self healing process. So if you could talk a little bit about you know where, as adults, we typically operate, what those brainwave different types of brainwave functions are and where you're at and how that self self healing process ignites, that would be helpful.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Okay, yes, you'll make it a very good point, like why is that that what I do actually, you know, makes sense and has some results? Well, there are different brainwaves and just to kind of quickly go through them, if we, you know, deep in sleep is delta waves, you know it's basically, we are, you know, anywhere between one to four, you know hurts, you know it's basically it's all about restoring the power of sleep. You know, having a bit of a, you know, like, you know, deeper relaxation than being in any other state, but that are waves that comes at, you know, four to eight Hertz actually has a whole draw of treasures to offer and I'll dwell on that later. I'll just kind of very quickly walk you through. So, right after that the waves, we've got alpha waves. You know that's actually a, you know this relaxed state, not necessarily deeply meditative, but slightly meditative, where we have a bit of a creativity and a bit of a relaxed state, which is followed by beta waves. That's basically when we are alert, when we focus on task at hand, when we're thinking about the environment, and then followed up with the very high frequency, gamma, gamma waves, you know, because we're talking about the range of story, to a hundred Hertz, and that's actually all about like having some peak experience in terms of our focus or getting insights, or synchronizing certain processes in our brain.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Now, all of these great and good, but all the treasures, for some reason seem to be resided only in the theta band. Why is that? Well, because you know, kind of loosely described as a nice deep meditative state, you know, from four to seven point five or eight Hertz. You know kind of sometimes described as like a slow activity, but it's linked to things that are extremely important, like intuition, creativity, you know, daydreaming, kind of fantasizing, you know, having all these options open to us. But at the same time it's a repository for our sensations, emotions, memories and, most importantly, empathy, which in turn has another component related to all of them is the healing component.

Anatoly Yakorev:

So you see, it's interesting. Right, it's not really fair not to spread them all against the spectrum, but have them all kind of get accumulated in the theta band waves. You know a level. So that's why you know it's, this is why it's such a such a chest of treasures, because we're looking at not just necessarily just the deep internal focus that accompanies us and our meditations and prayer and, like our, you know level of spiritual awareness, but it's also because this is where the it's accompanied by our restorative powers that basically have to do with the resting state and the healing state and, at the same time, dealing with the memory storage and how we learn and perceive the world around us. Okay, so, so this is like, in a nutshell, what theta waves are all about. As you can see, compared to other waves, theta seems to be having all the great stuff.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

And your experience before you talk any further about where you were, you reside and how that relates to the process as we grow up and we emerge out of childhood, in the teenage years and then in adulthood. What happens with brain waves and why, while all of them have a positive benefit to them, is there anything that happens where we get kind of stuck in a particular version of those that can cause problems for us?

Anatoly Yakorev:

Well, this is just natural process of maturing, you know, because, for children, say, age up to seven or eight or maybe sometimes nine years of age, experiencing theta waves is natural. It's their natural state. But as they start, like you know, growing up, and you know the, because of the processes, including what's going on in the cranium and everything, and with the growing brain, is gradually shifting to beta waves. This is where the you know, the alertness resides, this is where all the thinking you know is being developed. So, therefore, this you know, when you sometimes, you know, talk about kids who sometimes exhibit an unusual level of creativity they see things, have imaginary friends, they have an ability to connect to that invisible world that we no longer have access to. Okay, so, therefore, you know, with time, yes, it's not really good to lose that, but unfortunately this is the biological process. So the clock is ticking and moving us towards beta, because that's where we are more comfortable with the way we survive in this world, with the way we grow and develop skills necessary.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Would you say that beta is more externally focused versus the theta would be more. Would be more internally focused.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Yeah, yeah because that way is more like you know, it's all about the environment around us, how we need to focus on dealing with other people, how we, you know, can interact with the world in a more efficient way. It's no longer internalizing our experiences. Like children as we are, you know, we are more like left to our own devices to experience the world around us on our own terms. Okay, so, while when we grow up, we have to grow and use skillset to deal with other people, you know, to learn the rules of the game around us. So therefore, beta waves are more suited for the task.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Well, it seems to me, you know, and we're going back to something we talked about earlier, about how executives are kind of on this hamster wheel which is kind of pulling them into beta because the external world is calling them the external, external, external, and we talk about the limitations of, hey, try to get an executive to maybe be quiet, to meditate, to spend some time being internal, to take that attention and turn it towards that internal state, which would be more theta-oriented, right, but how challenging that is for them. But that's the value of it. Right is to be real, to recoup that. But now talk a little bit about yourself and how that can shift for executives as they go through this process, how that shift away from maybe they have an access to theta more often, or whatever. If you could share a little bit about you know where you experience yourself most of the time and how that helps the process, and how that then begins to ignite something different in the executive.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Yeah, well, this is a good question, because for me, when I was growing up, apparently I must have stuck, you know.

Anatoly Yakorev:

I must have gotten stuck in that theta state because of the continuous way of experiencing the world in the same fashion when I was a kid, right. But that doesn't mean that this could be easily, you know, transmitted to people, because we all see the whole thing. The whole experience happens in a phenomenon called the brain-to-brain entrainment, or actually more like this interpersonal neural synchrony, which happens between the speaker and the listener, and it's all happening in the auditory space.

Anatoly Yakorev:

How the electromagnetic element of that actually happens is a different story, but what we need to focus on is what exactly needs to happen so that the other person begins to experience this process of transformation. That's happening, and it's not only happening, but it's also like helping them stay in that state. So that's why you know again what I like about it is simplicity, the way I create the theta band experience. Strangely enough, it comes from the fact that I'm not an English native speaker. So when I speak, I create a little linguistic phenomenon called syllabic parsing. It's the way I pronounce syllables that become more in sync with my theta state and therefore, when you're listening to me talk, something in your biological setup nervous system gets attuned to that and, as a result, the theta state through the mirror neural system gets replicated and therefore it stays there and makes sure that the transformative process to heal deep inside commences and carries on until it's complete.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Okay, so you see what I'm saying is interesting, right? It's not about me chanting mantras or saying something or bringing something totally out of whack into the picture. It's just me started telling the way I pronounce things, but the rest of it is you. It's all about you and it's all about your own resources, how your body responds to the auditory signal coming from me. So, therefore, I think it would be fair to shift the whole aspect of self healing on to clients, because it's those clients that have anything that they need inside of them.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Right. So, to summarize you being in theta state all the time and the way that you do the sessions through auditory voice, there is a connection and a link to that state within them which ignites a self healing process within them that allows all these new resources to become available to them. Is that hard to say yes, yes.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

And there's no impact on one's self authority. They're not giving their power over to you. They're not, you know. Oh, they owe you their life for the rest of their lives or anything like that. It's simply. It's kind of like starting a fire. You're the spark that reignites. First of all, your process starts, a process that recalibrates their nervous system back to factory settings that seems to appear, to what happened, and then then their own individual expression becomes to move through that without any obstacles and without any blocks, and the internal resources we talked about earlier deeper intuition, other resources in the heart or gut or whatever it is they become more available to them that allows them to move at a faster pace without being overwhelmed by it.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Yes, absolutely, absolutely.

Anatoly Yakorev:

What's really important is, again, I'm not questioning or not bringing into question their self authority, I'm not changing anyone's belief systems, I'm not doing anything Right, because all their belief systems stays, their character traits, anything that they have undergoes no, undergoes no change whatsoever, so anything that's happening inside of them, coming to the fore and experiencing all of that.

Anatoly Yakorev:

But this is not the end of it, because to integrate all of those changes in a very clever fashion, that's where you are so important, because a lot of times those experiences they're so war that people just don't know how to process them. And you know, I think actually it would be fair to say sometimes they miss the value of what they get because of the resistance of their belief systems, because of the resistance of their ego structures that tries to annihilate the transformative experience and maybe dilute it down to 10%. They're kind of throwing away so much and therefore your role is extremely. I think your role is equally important here, because I can help people transform, but then they themselves try to suppress it, to really retain, you know like, retain their self perception, so, which means that they could ideally reduce the entire transformation, you know, down to maybe 10%, 15% at best. So that's why that's where you step in, because you need to guide them through the process and help them appreciate all the gains they have made, just to help them see all the benefits along the way.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Yeah, and we learned that early on, because we have this amazing thing as human beings I think you mentioned it you can, somebody could save your life. You can be grateful for about a minute and then the gratitude goes away. It's like you can have a tremendous transformational experience, but if you don't spend the time to integrate it, you can lose the full power of it. And when I think about what is opened up through the reset process, you know it is truly a treasure house and you know, and I've been had the good fortune, as well as Alex, my partner, to talk to you on a regular basis and after following the reset, and we saw the value in that because they had questions, could be answered, we could be directed to do certain practices that would support the process, and we were keen, because of our background and interest and why we're in the professions we are, to truly understand how this a miracle kind of works. And so and I've seen that with my clients too as we've applied coaching and made it now you must do coaching afterwards.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

It's not an option, because we don't want you to miss the treasure that's been opened up to you, the treasure house that's been opened up to you and that's been, that's been really useful, and so this goes, this goes back to like OK. So once the reset is done and they're feeling that increased energy, that the greater focus, the more confidence, the ability to deal in high pace situations without being overwhelmed and being very resilient in those situations, dealing with difficult people more effectively, you know all that's happening. What do they have to do to take advantage of the reset? What is the? What is the the minimal they must do to ensure that they get maximum benefit from the experience of the reset?

Anatoly Yakorev:

Well, definitely, your coaching is absolutely key to help them integrate all of that. But at the same time, it's more than just advisable to proceed with some sort of a practices that will help support their newly acquired state, and that being two things First, being reflective. So self reflection is absolutely key Because if you don't pay attention to all the benefits and gains you have received and you have acquired, a lot of that goes out the window. So journaling is the best to to reflect on things you begin to uncover about yourself. Like, oh, I behave differently in that situation with my boss. Oh, you know, I no longer get ticked, I no longer fly off the handle. When I have a situation with my director, ports Okay. Or when I have a new challenge, I used to like freak out and be reactive and do silly things, but somehow I feel detached from that level of reactivity I used to have.

Anatoly Yakorev:

So you know, as they normally say, that like you said, you know, like if you say someone's life, you know, our brain can only be grateful for up to maybe five minutes. We can begin to hate our savior with the utmost passion. You know passion, just because we just don't want to be locked into that state of gratitude. It's hard, it's difficult for our ego, but strangely enough, after the reset it's the gratitude that so much is talked about needs to be embraced.

Anatoly Yakorev:

You wake up in the morning, people around you, people you see, people you work with, you wake up with gratitude and then you've followed up by yourself reflection that deals with also issues like self care and self leadership. There's a liking of pivotal elements. That alone is enough and at the same time you know for maybe a short meditation once a day, 15, 20 minutes that would be ideal. But at the same time, to undertake this without the reset would not appear to be lucrative to a lot of people, right, because they just don't see the connection between this. It may only happen after you come out of the reset and people are working with you to integrate all the new experiences they have. They also have to dedicate not just a lot of time, but enough time to make sure they see changes happening and occurring on a daily basis with them, so they can always go back to the first pages of their diary and say oh, you know I used to be like this.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Now, fast forward two months down the road, I no longer have those reactions I used to have. Why is that important? Because in the process the belief systems are subject to undergo the gradual change and as you go through the change, little by little, only your journaling can show you that your belief systems have changed. But nobody forced you to do that. You did it on your own and you were reflective of all those changes along the months that follow. So that's why I'm positive that only those two elements, or three elements at best, would be enough to actually attempt to the reset.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

And that's not a lot to ask. Right, it doesn't take that much time to do those things. Talk a little bit about the integration process so you've been speaking about that a little bit just then but what's occurring within the nervous system and within the brain as people? The body and the nervous system is adapting to this change, and how long does that typically take, or the range of how long that typically takes, for the process to be complete, if you will?

Anatoly Yakorev:

Okay, well, let's not get deep into any newer science here. Let's just talk about certain elements like timing. Okay, so it's very individual. For some people it's a matter of weeks. You know when the whole rewiring is happening.

Anatoly Yakorev:

You know like in the background, so to speak. But we also don't let's not forget that we need to also wrap our head around those changes, how it takes longer for our brain to take heed of all these changes and understand that, oh, I'm less reactive, so I need to adjust accordingly, maybe change my behavior a bit, right, or I'm more insightful, oh, okay, I have to acknowledge that as well. So we are balancing out different things here. So anything that's happening on a neural level in our central nervous system and our brain, you know that also needs to be accompanied by our own processing of what's going on. So we're talking about a matter of weeks to several months. But again, it's very individual.

Anatoly Yakorev:

You know, I had a guy way back, you know he was like 74, but his ability to integrate all of that in the most national fashion was phenomenal. You know, I barely talked to him for about I don't know half hour, without even having a formal session, and the guy went into this creative state. He wrote his autobiography, he wrote up a book, then he wrote a TV script for a drama for television. I don't know, it was just crazy and he couldn't stop See. It was going on and on for about like a month and a half, close to two months.

Anatoly Yakorev:

So it's very individual, and you may have asked me, like, okay, do people need to be, like, have some pre-existing condition to be a better fit for that?

Anatoly Yakorev:

Right, you know well, technically speaking, there is no difference, as you have observed, david, right? So people that normally we worked with, they didn't have like any, you know, like special, you know path down this ritual development or anything that they usually be doing, that that would be out of the ordinary. No, pretty much like people would be, you know, just normal people. So there are no preconditions, because sometimes, you know, people just say like, oh, that's all good, you get this, all this stuff, but maybe people have done a ton of self-development work prior to the reset, right, so, but actually that's not the case. Sometimes, though, even all that extra work that people do, sometimes we even get in the way because people start putting all that within the framework of their previous belief systems, right, and therefore it's becoming a bit of a conundrum. So that's why I would like to highlight the fact that there are no, there is no need for any existing preconditions or having done any work prior.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

I would say that even even it's funny because a couple of the clients that have been through this process had a faster and more profound experience right away than I did and I had. I had 35 years of meditation and studying, personal development and becoming a coach, and I will find that some people that don't have any of those expectations or actually go faster because they don't have those preconditions that have to be worked through or or that kind of thing, now there are. There are certain qualities that an individual has and have in place for the impact of the work you know. So who is immune to your gift? In other words, who, what people? What individual? Because it's not for every human being on the planet, right? So what is what? Is the? The what would disqualify somebody from getting full benefit from what you have to have to offer of this?

Anatoly Yakorev:

put it that way yeah Well, I wouldn't say like, yeah, like, let's, let's call it immunity to me, right.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Immunity to you, rather disqualification, that's a better word. Yeah, I agree, I agree.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Yeah, well, let's put it this way, just let's go back to what I said before, that you know, but the fact that you know it's the limbic system which is key to everything, because once that limbic resonance is established, the rest of it follows. So, therefore, people who are early on in lives, you know, had some problem with the way the limbic system developed over over years, you know, apparently they would end up being on the different, you know, a neurodivergent spectrum. Okay, right, so people who, let's say, are immune to me are those people who sit, maybe in that narcissistic spectrum, you know, and various offshoots of that. Well, they call it a disorder, but it comes in different shapes and colors, and so we don't know sometimes, but sometimes again, that's, that's, this is the way people are brought up that actually impacts them later in life. For example, I myself, I'm very introverted, so it's not a surprise that other introverted people respond so well to me. Okay, but I'm more like on the neurotic spectrum so, which means that it's basically people who tend to internalize things. Right, even though it has a bad rap as the term.

Anatoly Yakorev:

But neurodivergent people are the ones that had various alterations in their neural development over the years. They would be the ones who are not really. You know the kind of material you know that I can work with, even though sometimes I've met individuals who come from that spectrum and they responded very positively to me. However, to bring them to that level of completion, with the level of assurance needed, I would not be able to say that that could be possible. So, even if they respond to me positively, there's no guarantee that I can deliver that level of, you know, guarantee in their personal transformation.

Anatoly Yakorev:

So now that being on the developmental side, then anything that has to do with the level of physical damage to the brain you know, the preferable cortex or something you know, like all those important parts of the brain that could have been affected that also can make it inaccessible, you know, for me to have any impact on. And lastly, any chemical imbalance due to ingestion of I don't know drugs and substance. Substances and maybe you know, alcohol abuse and stuff like that definitely affects the limb system to a point where I can't really engage with an individual. So that's why prescreening prior to commencing the process is important, so that you know there are no false expectations. And so what's people actually make sense that, okay, I feel like I'm a good fit, or, you know, maybe there is something that gets in the way, so it would be fair to address them early on.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Right, yeah, so that we do. There is a prescreening process we go through to make sure you are best suited and even if you the prescreening process we've had in certain cases, you know, on a scale from one to 10, we like to see a seven, eight, nine, 10s kind of like. But if they're at a five or six they may still go through the process and we've found people still benefit it from it. But we just can't make the strong of a guarantee at that level. Right, indeed, right. So what? A healthy brain and nervous system, as you said, or not neuro-typical? What are other qualities of people that make this something that's a very robust experience for them? What other qualities should they have, as far as you know already, being a good leader, caring in certain ways. What other qualities and inequalities are positive indicators that they'll have a good experience?

Anatoly Yakorev:

Oh, okay, well, you know, let's put it this way, if people come with those innate qualities already of being, you know, naturally predisposed to being good leaders, or especially character traits, they get further amplified, you know, because even though sometimes people who are kind of naturally introverted, you know, they may become less so as their confidence grows. But what I really found to be interesting is that if people are, you know, basically demonstrate not necessarily just leadership elements but the qualities of being just a person with good and responsible, healthy attitude to life, that gets further amplified to an extent that makes them, you know, kind of pushes them to the top of anything that could potentially be available to them as they grow. So it's interesting, if people come with a positive attitude, they already have developed certain skills in life and well-meaning people and positive that gets amplified greatly. But even if they have self-doubt and various other elements that they have in them, it doesn't mean that they cannot grow this same spectrum.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Right, right, as I said in the beginning, you know people have built, have had emotional junk loaded over just being in life over the years. That can mute, confidence can mute, you know, capacity to have energy can mute even. You know being able to have a hard time maintaining my focus moment to moment. All those things are a natural part of living life. That gets cleared up with this process in a certain way and allows them to get those things back, you know. And so let's talk about some of the success stories, without you know naming names right now, but I think that you know what I've generally seen in my clients is at least a 30%. That's hard to measure. I think for them it might even be more than that Uptick in the confidence, energy-focused creativity, interpersonal engagement. They're able to be somehow more present with people, get to the heart of the matter faster.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

A big one is dealing with difficult people Like it's almost like they're bulletproof of difficult people. They don't get frustrated and there's. You know, when you hire into an organization and you have a large organization, you're going to have a certain percentage of difficult personalities in that organization. They may be super smart, exactly what you need in the role, but they also can cause costs of time to deal with their intensity or their personalities and I find that leaders all of a sudden get very effective at dealing with those kinds of individuals. I've seen improvements in resilience and the ability to deal with things more effortlessly and not let an overwhelming situation get to them.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

You know even one of my clients that you know going to airports was an issue for him and dealing with all that you deal with with delays and it's just natural when you're traveling, you know what it's like and none of that gets to him anymore. He just go. I have a moment to reflect. I have a moment to read. They reframe everything in a positive way in a certain way. I mean we've had a number of clients raise in their careers and, you know, get promotions or a new job out of the gate from doing this. That is, it was a better fit for them. You know. You know more self-control, more more attendance to self-care and more harmony in the midst of a heavy workload. So I don't know if you'd add anything to that as far as what you've seen with people that have been through the process. But feel free to share.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Well, you make it a good point because you know if you will we'll all heard this phrase that when people say, like you know, if you want to change something, like you know, change your attitude, well, it's easy to say that you have to change your attitude.

Anatoly Yakorev:

To any adversity you may encounter experience, but mentally it's very difficult. But what we discovered, like we describe, you know, with people, it's the fact that people shift their attitude internally. It doesn't go through their mental filtering system, so, which means that they naturally step into a new way they relate to the world. And what helps them, see, that is when you actually alert them to that change. Because if you imagine, if you don't actually alert someone to all those deep changes, it's not about taking it for granted, it's just making sure you can monitor all those positive changes that you have undergone. If you don't monitor that you know, how do you know where you end up, how do you begin to appreciate your own path, or you know your own journey? So this is where it's important to see oh, I'm no longer frustrated with the long line you know that I have to wait for.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Oh, why is that? You know that down core, when I'm jogging, doesn't seem to faze me anymore, you know. So stop with that. You know even people can relate to that with a bit of like a smile. Well, you and I know it's not just a small thing, because if you take a mental snapshot of that situation and you put it in a business related scenario or situation, that could be translated into, you know, massive gains for this person, for the business there running, and so forth.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Well, I think you know the ultimately, you know the truth of the matter is, while you have trajectories and visions and desires to impact the future, the only time you can do anything about anything is in the present moment and that's becoming at it right now. Right, and what I find with clients in a nutshell is they are more present to what's happening and what's happening doesn't. They don't have a strong judgment about what's happening. They have discernment about how to deal with the situation, but they don't judgment. One of the things we do is like we don't like what's happening and so we create that weight on top of ourselves which mutes our focus, mutes our energy, mutes our passion, mutes our confidence and Then, further that, we stack.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

A time there's something that I had I had to do with what's happening, that's I don't like it's happening.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

So now I'm beating myself up, you know, or whatever.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

There's different, there's different adjectives to how we react to the present moment and what I see clearly from this process is Most of that goes away for people and they said I just got to deal with what's happening because it happened, I can't do anything about it, it happened, I don't, might not like it, but now how can it be effective in actually seeing this as an opportunity to maybe help one of my direct reports grow or to Help the the one of my peers see the light on something you know, by having a different kind of conversation with them or improving my relationship with people, because we're going through some tough times so they see utility in the moment as well.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

They're not only more present, they see the utility of the moment rather than the downsides of the moment. Yeah, now there's some preparation that people have to do Do for these sessions with you as minimal. But one of the things you came up with and you've developed is this idea of a letting go list and Also them creating a joy list so you can. Can you talk to those, the reason why you have people do those lists and how that helps in the process.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Basically, since we talked about the fact that it's a self healing process. Ideally there should be no need for any lists.

Anatoly Yakorev:

But what I discovered? Because to preempt People's minds, to try to undo the whole Transformative work, I came up with the idea to remove Any of those traumas or those traumatic events that they've been hauling you know throughout their lives. So I just say once that you commit those traumatic events and you create that let go of list, I Can remove all of that just in front of you, just before your very eyes, so you can see that I'm not doing that. It's your body is already capable of. I've been in sync with me to purge and flush out all those negative blockages. So that's fairly easy and rarely people come up with more items on that list than seven or eight. Yeah, so people. Usually that's about the number of things that people really want to get rid of, to get that instant assurance that they have received when I said they would.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Now the second list is the more like a good wish list is the one which actually is a perfect for seamless integration, right on the heels of the removal of any trauma-related Experiences, because as if it kind of frees up space To integrate your own vision about yourself, about your life, the way you relate to yourself or the way to you relate to this whole experience called life and Therefore I usually tell people like you don't have to be very specific, you just just think about a vision you want to have for yourself and we'll just have this integrated, because you're most open right now in your shifting state to anything that you can support as the change happening inside your body, and usually people you know they report very positively on the outcome of that and and yes, it does present a bit of a challenge to create those lists. But come on, I mean, like it's not rocket science, think about something you really want to get rid of and something you want to focus on having in life.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Yeah, well, and I really asked the clients and I found the clients that really dig into the letting go list and really go look at you know, most might even say they had a positive upbringing, upbringing Yet you might have, you know, a parent that over empowered them in a certain way and that might end up causing them not to have confidence in themselves in certain situations because they don't have that empowerment anymore.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

So it could also be. There's also things that have happened in childhood where we were invalidated, either by a bully or we might have been in our, in our home, or we, we. There are many traumas that happen and that really have this way of holding us back and Fully expressing ourselves, and so that's a gift from that. And I think the joy list is something that you know You're leaning into and I find that most executives it's very interesting when they do their joy list. It has very little to do with the work and more has to do with their internal experience. They're wanting to have what you will have a direct, positive impact on their work if they have that internal experience. So it still has a direct impact on their work, but it's more robust and more integrated into their life and and post reset. How? How does especially that joy list support people as they integrate? What? What would you say that that that list that they create in the process helped? How does that help them? How can that be utilized to help them post reset?

Anatoly Yakorev:

Well, technically, is like they have to attend to that list and revisit to see what gains they're making. Yes, in relation to the list, it's like a measuring stick in a certain way. Yes, because what happens is like, without reminding them of you know, to do that, it seems to be like it, they, they become aware of that, but then they completely forget about it, completely, it just goes out the window. So, therefore, you know, making sure that they hold themselves, you know, more, like Just kind of for them to be more aware of the fact that what they put on that list Begins to slowly manifest in their life is really important, because if they don't use that as a way to measure their own progress, they invalidate their own experience. So that's why your role, by the way, is very important here to keep them, you know, to remind them of that.

Anatoly Yakorev:

All right, remember you, you were thinking about that to happen. Oh, yeah, that has already happened, but I already put it out of my mind. Oh, really, so the moment it happened, you just kind of like decided to forget all about it as if it never happened. Because that's the way our minds sometimes work to invalidate our experience. And yeah, so that's why, that's why you know, being consistent with those lists helps people stay Stover, and you know, and pay attention to their own gains as they make progress.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Yeah, and I love it because the the joy list really shows the results. And we want results, we want our clients to have. You know, I wanted to have the results that they most aspire to have so that they can be the leaders, the enlightened leaders. We want to see more in the world and those, those lists, actually allow you to Measurably see the impact of the process. And there's something about putting keeping one's attention on that process because even after integration, is it done or is there still deepening? That happens. What would you say after integration happens is this, is this process? The process is complete, but what additional fruits may come from over time, having done this, Well, you use the word deepening.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Well, deepening is actually important because, like I said, you know, after the process of rewiring is complete, in parallel you've got the shift in belief systems occurring, like integrating all these neural changes. What do I make of it? What do I do after I have discovered that I have changed? So should I act on this or should I try to pretend it never happened? This is where the shift in the belief system is an important to actually embrace anything positive that happened.

Anatoly Yakorev:

I know you may say it's really silly. Why would anyone look down on their own positive gains? Well, this is tricky. That's the way our brain is wired right. Our ego Steps in to say, wait, wait, look, this is. You know. We need to maintain the Personality integrity here. Right, this is my, you know. So I don't have this Personality crisis by having experienced something positive because it's not in line with my kind of like, rather rational or maybe negative. You know attitudes or something so. So this is where it's important to actually have and allow time for further deepening, because the shift in belief systems is going to bring the entire integration when all of that stuff that's been going on outside of your eyes outside of your eyes will merge with the way you're thinking about this world and your Self-perception changes.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Right. Well, that's been my experience. It's been two years later and, although I think the integration process is complete, there is still more that's opened up to me because of the reset that allows me to deepen healing, to move through new Processes of things that I didn't weren't aware that were there, but much more easily than before. It's almost like I have to meet it head on and if I do, it dissolves right and there's a, there's a something occurred within me from the process that allows it to continue and deepen, even though the integration is complete. Well, as we approach that, I approached you into the podcast. Is there anything else you you'd like to cook that we didn't cover in the Conversation? Do you think is important to mention at this point, as we can, yes, the conversation.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Well, I would like to stress one thing here, because I sort of foresee potential Criticism coming like oh, you know, what you're doing is probably like you know, there's a placebo effect or there's an LP involved or there's, you know, some hypnotic Practice or some psychological manipulation.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

LP or it's an LP or whatever, neuro linguistic chromium. What you did.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Yes, exactly yeah, that's right. So so you see, I mean because why would that be the case? Because there's so much noise out there.

Anatoly Yakorev:

We and you know in most cases, yes, it has created the level of distrust for all those things that people claim they have. So therefore, you know, it's natural for people to Challenge me on what I do. I said, look, I'm not Using or practicing any of that. Okay, so that's important to say. So there is no sublime Messaging or psychological manipulation or anything of that sort involved. Basically, it's all based on simple things, linda Kresen and mirror neural system, interbrain neural Synchrony, and the theta band or theta wave, brain wave band, interbrain neural synchronization, right? So this is basically all the risk to it.

Anatoly Yakorev:

So, therefore, I'm not putting any of my Beliefs or ideas into anyone's you know, subconscious mind, right? So that's why I would like to stress that, because you know we talked about so many wonderful things, that is quite natural that people may just say, like you know, oh yeah, well, it's just, it reminds us, like, of all the stuff we've heard other people say and but and again, just to say that the whole point is very straightforward, it's a very simple format and the fact that you, as a seasoned executive coach, identified Elements in my approach, be that, you know, trauma related, trauma related and resilience related. These are two tricky components that very few practitioners can address, because people may talk about it, but as long as you have ways of dealing with it, it's just all noise Okay. So that's why I think, when you identify the value of addressing those two Mostly you know most stubborn elements, I think that's where the real value resides.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Yeah, and that's that's what I'm deeply grateful for Founding in founding you and our partnership is that that I feel like I can. I can For a client that's really wanting to have a greater impact as a leader. And they do deeply care, they've already shifted in a leadership mindset. They're they're they're heart centered and their approach to leading they care about people and culture. They understand the value of those two things and they just want to create the maximum value they can for their employees experience, for the customer's experience, for the impact of their organization, obviously, on shareholders, etc. And they want to do that in the highest and best way. And they realize there may be some snags holding them back from fully expressing that.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Those are the ideal clients for us and and it's also seeing the results of working with people like that is just so rewarding To know that they are now on a new path that is less encumbered for them to have impact. You know so Well. Thank you very. Thank you very much for for joining me today and until I really appreciate you spent in the time with me. This is a bit longer of a podcast than we typically do. I was thinking about breaking this up into two parts, but I'm just gonna leave it as it is and people will just have to break it up Into two parts themselves. But I wanted to make this a robust, more robust inquiry and I appreciate you taking the time with me to do that today.

Anatoly Yakorev:

Yes, thanks for having me, as it was very, very interesting.

David Craig Utts - The Resilient Leadership Guy:

Yeah, good, good, and thank everybody. I'm gonna thank you again for hanging in there with us for today in this, in this podcast, and for taking the time to listen, unfazed under fire, and we look forward to more, more episodes coming out soon. Stay tuned and have a great rest of your day. David Kray, guts the result leadership guy signing off you.

Introduction
Unlocking Human Potential, Overcoming Mental Barriers
The Resilient Leader Method
Brain Waves and Self-Healing
The Process and Impact of the Leadership Resilience Reset
Personality's Impact on Transformation Process
Self-Healing and Integration Process